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Joined: Dec 2019
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LetFly Offline OP
Sidelock
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Sidelock

Joined: Dec 2019
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I am starting up a new SxS redo project. J.P. Sauer hammer gun #87003 12b. This is a total project gun. As acquired some years back the stock had been sanded to remove all checkering and leave locks and grip cap proud. Forend wood does not appear to be original and is smooth without checkering. Release fits well and is not proud. Barrels appear to have been cut by +0.5". Right barrel measures +0.727 and left +0.724. This Sauer was produced for Johannes Mitschke in Riga, Latvia. I have added a few photos for identification. My goal is to correct the proud metal by deepening the inletting and cutting new checking in a Sauer pattern of the period. If you have a Sauer hammer gun of this period and could post a couple of photos of the checkering pattern I would appreciate it.

I would date this 1891 - 1912 based on proof stamps and no date code. Also no eagle nitro stamp.
[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Purchased off Gunbroker years ago for very little money. It has been sitting in the safe for the past twenty years. Decided to put it back into shooting condition. Good thing I like projects. Take it apart and look what I find...

No less than five splits in the stock head...(six, found another as I cleaned oil from the head)

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Forend wood not original...

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Project gun. I will get it ready for next year woodcock season. Close and seal all splits, refit wood to metal, replace checkering and refinish with a oil/varnish.

Last edited by LetFly; 02/03/21 06:25 PM.
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LetFly Offline OP
Sidelock
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I would be interested in purchasing a forend from a parts gun of this vintage should you have one sitting about. Send me a PM if you have one to sell. Thanks.

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LetFly Offline OP
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The stock head de-oiled and cleaned. The marked lines show the splits that I will have to close and glue. Your advice on my Lefever project was invaluable so I am asking for help again on this one. I am tempted to try a small staple but the amount of wood may be a problem. Any and all advice welcome.

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

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Sidelock
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On that one , if I couldn't open the cracks wide enough to get glue into them and be satisfied that if was sufficient to hold,,I'd cut out the individual cracks a bit to allow it.
I sometimes use a coping saw if the crack is in a position so the sawing does not cut into any other wood or cut into the edge of inletting.

Here I'd use Dental Burrs to route out the cracks with the use of a Dremel (!! Oh Dear!)

Simple straight shanked small dia burrs with some length to them are great for cutting along the crack.
They are aggressive, cut clean and leave a cut no wider than the burr itself , if that is what you want.

You can cut away wood in odd shapes if needed and around corners , do undercuts, ect.

Each of those cracks can be routed along the crack lines and even then a bit deeper at the end of the crack line by simply tipping the bit and digging deeper under the wood.
If you want to include small staple repairs at the head, those relief features needed for the staple in the wood are also quickly cut out
cleanly with the same burr while you're at it.

When ready, glue up the cracks with sufficient glue to fill the small voids & add the staple(s) and replace the metal while the glue cures.
Lightly clamp into position so the wood can be set in the proper position.
With the cracks routed out and the wood relieved, the wood can often be pushed and pulled out of shape somewhat. Sometimes that's an advantage to correct small issues. But you don't want to overdo it. Not having the metal back in place when regluing the cracks can often leave you with quite a different inlet when cured than what you may expect to see.

Here's some Burrs I'm refering too. Not necessarily the only type. Just representative of the type I use. They come in all sorts of cutting head styles. I find this style easy to use when routing out cracks from the side of a SxS stock such as this. Called a 'cylinder cutting head' style.
Lots of them available on Ebay and other places on the Web and much less expensive than these..!

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Meisinge...tner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=101004420

1 member likes this: LetFly
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LetFly Offline OP
Sidelock
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axusa over on the German forum raises a good question of altering the hardware geometry should I try to deepen the inletting. So..

Any experience with using veneer? I have walnut +0.064 mm thickness that would raise the level to match the metal and allow for sanding to flush. I have not tried veneer before but might try it. Would be blended in and finished to match the stock color.

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LetFly Offline OP
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Sauer craftsmanship from the 1890's. Nicely done.

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

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Sidelock
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I have seen a boxlock that had the cheeks built up with matching wood.
After staining as needed, it was almost impossible to see.... until you knew.
Seems like a workable method.

Quote
=Any experience with using veneer? I have walnut +0.064 mm thickness that would raise the level to match the metal and allow for sanding to flush. I have not tried veneer before but might try it. Would be blended in and finished to match the stock color.


Dumb, but learning...
1 member likes this: LetFly
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LetFly Offline OP
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Gluing up the splits in the stock head. First step injecting glue deep into the cracks and binding tight.

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

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LetFly Offline OP
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Injury from nature and prior owner.

What happens when a prior own goes crazy with sandpaper. Not clear at this point how I will deal with this injury. Ideas welcome?

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Injury inflicted by nature. Over 110+ years the wood shrinks. Metal to wood gap becomes visible when both metal and wood are cleaned. Gap will be filled with Acraglas gel. Looking at this gap and the geometry of the connection between receiver and side plates it is obvious why there are splits in the stock head. All the recoil force is transmitted through these side plates to the upper wood.

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Prep to apply Acraglas gel to fill the metal to wood gap.

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Addition prep before bedding with Acraglas

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

Last edited by LetFly; 02/08/21 02:22 PM.
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LetFly Offline OP
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Receiver to stock head joint closed with Acraglas gel.

[Linked Image from jpgbox.com]

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