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I'm anxious to see the final results after staining (?) and applying finish. I have done several glued repairs and have had mixed results as far as hiding the glue line and getting it all to match up. On one, which was a crack behind the lock plate, it absolutely "went away". I can't even find where it was. But, on others it's still visible after finishing, and I am at a loss to determine why this happens.

I hope yours blends in so perfectly that you can't find it. Then, you can relate the procedure to us. I am just in awe of some of the work the pros do with hiding repairs in gunstocks.

Best, SRH


"With one foot in the grave ..........and one foot on the pedal, I was born a Rebel" T.P.
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Like Stan, I was also in awe of some of the virtually invisible repairs done by some stock repair specialists. That was what prompted me several years ago to do some tests of various adhesives. I planed some walnut and glued pieces together using a couple of PVA wood glues, cyanoacrylate, polyurethane glue, and several different epoxies. Then I sanded and finished the glue joints with various finishes. Titebond II wood glue gave me the best results with a well fitted joint.

Fitting and correct clamping is extremely important. If you count on any glue or epoxy to fill a slight gap, that glue line will be very visible when the finish is applied. No dye or color is going to help much. But even a perfectly fitted patch may stick out like a sore thumb if the patch does not match the parent wood. So I also keep a large box of different walnut scraps from various species of walnut. When doing a repair, it pays to spend some time to find a piece that has the same color, grain, figure, and pores as the stock I am repairing. Another trick is to use the point of an X-acto knife to artificially extend pores across the repair joint.


A true sign of mental illness is any gun owner who would vote for an Anti-Gunner like Joe Biden.

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BrentD, why are you reading my post, when you repeatedly claim that you use the IGNORE function to IGNORE my posts???

Must be a disingenuous Libtard thang.


A true sign of mental illness is any gun owner who would vote for an Anti-Gunner like Joe Biden.

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The type of finish you decide to use can play a crucial rule in hiding your glue joint. Explore some of the repair hiding techniques used in the furniture industry. Some pics of one I did last year:

https://www.doublegunshop.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=561916&page=1

Steve


http://www.bertramandco.com/

ACGG Professional metalsmith, firearms import services.
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Keith, I used Titebond on your recommendation on my Lefever to very good results (Titebond III). These splits were in the forend and stock head. The final finish was on the dark side and the glue lines are quite well hidden.

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Originally Posted By: LetFly
Keith, I used Titebond on your recommendation on my Lefever to very good results (Titebond III). These splits were in the forend and stock head. The final finish was on the dark side and the glue lines are quite well hidden.


It is interesting that Steven Dodd Hughes also recommends wood glues for gun repair. I've not used it myself since most of the cracks have been more easily dealt with using other adhesives that are a bit more weather resistant, though T3 is reasonably water resistant.

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Thought I would post a couple of photos of the checkering cradle I put together to work on this project. I bought the MTB wood cradle and I used RAM components as the articulated mounting support. Fully adjustable and solid when locked down. The spindle to hold a forend is courtesy of one displayed by Brian Dudley over on the PGCA forum.





Practice on an orphan forend


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Continuing with my project. My checkering tool experience.

For those interested in securing checkering tools this is what I have learned as I started out without a single checkering tool other than a couple of high quality rifflers or diesinker files. For checkering tools here is my experience. First, stay away from EBay for anything other than hard to find Dem-Bart NOS cutter bits. Sellers on Ebay and bidders must think these tools are scarce collector items. You will pay way too much. Second go to Jantz Knife Makers Supply in OK where you can purchase a Gunline Premier set for $150 or less. They also sell individual GL handles at $8 ( Ebay sellers will ask and get upwards of $40 for a single handle). Dem-Bart cutters will fit the Gunline handles. Brownell's see thru checkering handle is no longer available however you can get the same tool from Ullman Precision Products. These are more expensive and the cutter is sold separately. Handle and one cutter will cost $100. High quality if you are thinking of working on many projects. Ullman cutters @ $45 come in 90 and 75 degree and four different lengths so you really need to know what you need before buying.

Should anyone have additional information to share I and I am certain others would welcome any and all advice and suggestions. My thoughts are aimed at those who, like myself, want a few tools to use to freshen-up existing checkering and perhaps give one complete checkering job a try to pass the winter hours. High end checkering tools for the professional with carbide cutters are readily available.

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Finished working on matching the repair walnut piece color to the aged Parker forend walnut with an orange-brown solvent based wood dye. First time working with wood dye to blend in repair piece. I referenced Flexner and Jewitt on the application of wood dyes and my book - 600 Watercolors by S. Finmark to get the yellow-red-brown color mix. Next step is to apply the shellac finish and then finally recutting the checkering.


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Right up front please accept my thanks for the advice provided here. I appreciate the time spent to reply to my inquiries. Now to my current thoughts and questions.

I am about to begin the processes of putting an orange shellac finish on my 1893 Parker GH forend. My goal is to create a finish that is close to the original as I am able to accomplish. To this end I have accomplished the following. Mixed my own shellac in the these cuts and colors: 1# Plantina, 2# Blonde, 1# Orange, 1# Garnet. These are ready to be used if needed. I have BLO available, but not raw LO. I have Japan Dryer available if needed. I have caster oil available if needed.

After extensive reading I have decided that the technique of french polish is not required to apply the shellac. I will use a pad as in the french polish technique but will not be building up a gloss finish. Also, I will not be filling the pores in the walnut. I examined the wood on the Parker stock and the forend before starting the project and I see no evidence that filling the pores was part of the original wood finish process.

I have read the two articles by Austin Hogan (thanks to Mike McKinney at the PGCA for getting the Parker Pages USB to me in a timely manner) and I have consulted my gunstock finishing library works by Newell, Dunlap, Mills and Barnes, Howe, and modern texts by Flexner, Jewitt, Dresdner and Allan and the excellent collected work by Woodreaux (DoubleGun forum). This is what I have gleaned to date.

Hogan, through his experience as Parker collector and editor of the PGCA publication 'Parker Pages', along with material published in Chapter 10 of the Parker Story believes that a shellac finish was employed by Parker in finishing gun wood unless an oil finish was requested and only on higher grade Parkers. He does not provide any real details as to the exact process. I do not have a copy of The Parker Story and do not know the level of detail it contains.

Newell recommends the addition of caster oil (non-drying oil) as a plasticizer to the shellac.

A discussion on the Wood Web states that boiling raw linseed with shellac to produce a varnish, but this is not what I understand Parker would have used. A contributor to that discussion also states that mixing BLO and Shellac is not to be recommended. https://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Shellac_and_Linseed_Oil_Finishes.html

Mills and Barnes recommend the one-time application of raw linseed to the stock prior to the application of shellac. I see no evidence that the Parker wood was colored with linseed oil prior to application of shellac.

Dunlap gives his favorite technique of applying BLO to the wood following by shellac immediately and the use of the hand rather than a pad. I do not think this to be applicable either.

Howe has a strong distaste for "that orange shellac, colorless, dreadful, frightful looking, ... disfiguring looking finish" In a word awful, do not use.

Flexner, Dresdner, Jewitt, discussing the application of shellac to wood finishing in general, each recommend mineral oil as a lubricant and not linseed oil. None recommends a direct mixing of linseed oil, raw or boiled, in any proportion with the shellac. Oil only as a padding lubricant.

If you have direct experience with using shellac as a finish on a Parker (any gun wood) and not building up to a french polish technique finish and could provide a photo or two of the Parker wood I would be appreciative.

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