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#515079 - 06/01/18 08:51 PM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
ClapperZapper Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 06/12/06
Posts: 1960
Loc: Great Lakes region
Strangely, I have the complete service manuals (with pictures) AND a complete set of factory tools, and service and repair parts, for: Sturmey-Archer, Sachs, and Shimano, 3 speeds, over in my warehouse.

All the little springs, pawls, gears, etc left over from when my parents closed their bicycle shop.

I need to get that stuff out.

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#515080 - 06/01/18 08:53 PM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Ted Schefelbein Online   content
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/02/02
Posts: 7302
Loc: mpls, mn.
Karl,
I'm a spandex and lycra free kind of bicyclist. Not sure, but, there is likely a law or two I'd be in violation of if I put that stuff on.

All my bikes are $50 bikes.


On a sad note, Geoffroy Gournet appears to have washed his hands of bringing Darne, or any other French guns back and forth to France for repair. In the very near future, I'll be listing a 12 gauge, straight stock V19, that I bought, thinking I'd be able to have it's right handed stock replaced in France.

Oh well.



Best,
Ted

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#515096 - 06/02/18 09:49 AM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Dave Erickson Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 12/31/01
Posts: 707
Loc: Western Wisconsin
Ted, I'm just downriver in Trempealeau, WI, and my wife and I greatly enjoy the overall river corridor. Hope you stopped at the Nelson Cheese Factory!

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#515100 - 06/02/18 10:55 AM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Tinker Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/09/05
Posts: 858
Loc: Northern NV
Ted - it's interesting yet not surprising to see your fondness for the nice old bicycles.

I have a dear old friend who years ago got to work with Ernest Csuka at the Alex Singer bicycle workshop in France.

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#515112 - 06/02/18 02:17 PM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Argo44 Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 02/21/16
Posts: 1213
Loc: McLean, Virginia
Ted is the Savant of slide actions; He's also the Porte Parole pour les Stephanois; All the French gun makers in Saint Etienne made bicycles - Ted is obviously carrying on a French tradition.

By the way, I went and checked 1960'ish cycle weights:
-- A classic 1960 Schwinn with headlights, double bars, steel rims, luggage rack - 58 lbs



-- My old 1950s Raleigh Sport (called "English racer" by us at the time) 3 speed with racks on back and front and lock/cable along with luggage rack, steel on steel, steel seat post, rims, pommel, handle bars, fenders, chain guard, kick stand, pump, lights, generator, tool bag - as pictured - 51 lbs - add a pack to the luggage rack and you're up to 70. Dry without the baskets. luggage rack, generator, tool kit, but with the fenders and chain guard it was probably 30.



I can't believe we were pedaling that weight back in 1959-60; Florida doesn't have a lot of hills but we labored up the few it did.


Edited by Argo44 (06/02/18 08:32 PM)
_________________________
Baluch are not Brahui, Brahui are Baluch

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#515130 - 06/02/18 07:40 PM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Stan Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/03/02
Posts: 9573
Loc: somwers in Jawja
I had a Schwinn with "balloon" tires when I was about 10-11. It was great for negotiating these sandy dirt roads. A deep sandbed didn't slow me down, but a black neighbor could outrun me bad on the hard road, in a race. He laughed at me so much that I begged for a three-speed English racer. Dad bought me one in Augusta for my birthday, or Christmas, can't remember. I loved racing even then, and next time I got the chance I challenged him to a rematch. I started off in second gear, and he pulled off from me as usual. But, when I hit third I came around him and left him wondering what just happened.

Those little skinny tires weren't worth a crap in a sandbed, tho'.

Good memories. Thanks for them.

SRH


Edited by Stan (06/02/18 07:42 PM)
_________________________
..................from my cold, dead hands.

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#515134 - 06/02/18 09:09 PM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
pmag Offline
Sidelock
*

Registered: 10/26/06
Posts: 116
My thanks to all of you. I think I will contact J.J. in Enid.

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#515149 - 06/03/18 12:27 AM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Ted Schefelbein Online   content
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/02/02
Posts: 7302
Loc: mpls, mn.
Dave,
We usually stop at The Smiling Pelican for lunch on the tour, it was cleaned out this year, and we ate at a bar in the same town-the waitresses were a bit too friendly, as I remember. We ALWAYS hit the cheese factory in Nelson, at that point in the ride you are very much ready for an ice cream cone, and to get your hindquarters off of a Brooks saddle. After that, I head across the bridge into Wabasha, and a well deserved hot tub, dinner at Slippery's, and an early bedtime. Most of the animals on the tour camp, at the big campground in the middle of Wabasha. I'm over camping.

Gene,
The original poster would appear to have had his question politely answered, and since my name made the title of the thread, and the conversation has veered off into another of my irrational interests (postwar English consumer bicycles) I am going to attempt to just as politely correct a few points about that topic.
The "English Racer" you posted a photo of, is actually a 28" rod braked version of the more commonly imported Sports model, of the same era. I can assure you, few to no children rode such a bicycle in this country, they were too large and expensive. It would have weighed more than 51 lbs, also. The name "English Racer" while commonly heard in your era, is a misnomer, these bikes were never intended for racing of any sort. They were simply what a typical Englishman rode for basic transportation from the late 1920s until perhaps the 1970s, and sold well in the US at the same time-fewer Englishmen owned cars in this era than their American counterparts. WIth a bit of maintenance, these are bicycles that can easily see 50-100 years of daily use, and many Englishmen are riding bicycles their Grandparents purchased decades before they were born.
My daily rider:





This, a model I own three of, is the rarely encountered five speed version of the Sturmey Archer internal gear hub, the S5, fitted to the "Sprite", a higher end Sports model. There are actually six gears in that hub, but, the two in the middle are the same ratio, so it is known as a five speed. I modify the gearing on all our bikes, typically using a 20-22 tooth sprocket on the hub, and a 44 on the crank. The Sturmey, either S5 or AW three speed, as delivered, is simply geared too high for actual use. I bought this bike at a garage sale, and it had leaned against an outside storage shed for so long, the hubs were level with the ground, the bottom half of the rims sunk in the dirt. All I wanted was the hub, and the owner told me I could buy the hub for $10, or get the whole bike out for free. I have completed 7 or 8 Lake Pepin tours on this old bike, a 1967.

A few shots of my Son's bike:

This is a five year old, ready to begin his rather chilly first Lake Pepin tour, 6 years ago:





This is a 1963 Raleigh Colt, built before the company had gone to the cost cutting measures of Dutch wheels versus the heavier Westrick rims, and plastic fittings on the shift cable wheel, and fulcrum clamp. I got it from the founder of the Lake Pepin tour, 81 year old Noel Robinson, a man who still rides and completes the tour every year. My Son INSISTED the bike not be restored, simply cleaned, repaired, and put back in service. You 'gotta love a five year old who appreciates patina. The bike has been modified with short 10 speed cranks to allow Chris to "spin" which, keeps him riding all day, but, it still doesn't go up the Bay City hill by itself!

The survival rate of 17" boys Raleigh bikes in this country is likely less than 1/10 of 1% of production.

Lake Pepin Tour "bling":



Christopher began riding the tour when he was 5. He had trouble getting his feet on the ground the first year, but, we practiced a move where I came to a stop in front of him, and "caught" the stem of his bike as he came to a stop next to me. It worked beautifully, and, along with starting from a curb, he became the youngest rider ever to do the Tour in the self propelled catagory (babies have done it, from a bike trailer) and the youngest record is one Chris still holds.
A young lady, seeing Chris buzzing around on the start of the tour this year, asked him if he was going to "try" the Tour. He came to a stop and replied "I tried it when I was five, and have done it every year since. I'm doing the tour, again"
I don't know if she was impressed or horrified when she saw the bag tags on his bike.

Best,
Ted


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#515151 - 06/03/18 01:16 AM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Argo44 Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 02/21/16
Posts: 1213
Loc: McLean, Virginia
Ted, my post was intended to be admiration - please don't be offended. That Raleigh was precious to me from age 12-17. It was my transportation - the South was poor at the time - in Gainesville we didn't have all those Southern California hot cars in 1962 as seen in "American Graffiti." I don't think there were above 20 cars in the "senior parking lot" and most of those were early 50's stick shifts.

I rode my "English Racer" (Raleigh sport) to school from 6th grade to 12th grade. I played bicycle polo with it (we invented the sport using old golf woods and a softball)...we toured N.Florida on them when it was still "cracker" including pushing them in the deep sand in "the big Scrub" east of Gainesville towards the Saint John's river. I wish I still had it;

There's a Raleigh Sport in the Museum of American History on the Mall it was so popular. In no way did I intend to cast aspersions on your bike. It was supposed to be a light-hearted "well done."

This is my bike for the last 13 years. I don't tour on it though the bike trails here run all the way to the Blue Ridge and if you use the C&O Canal tow-path 230 miles up to Columbia, Maryland. I do try to put 10 miles a day when I'm in the country and have a 18 mile loop from McLean, almost to Mount Vernon, then up along the Potomac and back beside Rte 66.

Why a Le Monde? In Brussels in 1986 in February on a cold rainy day my wife and I were sitting in a small cafe off the Petite Sablon when an American walked in; we struck up a conversation; he wanted to buy a cheap sofa - we'd just bought one (we still have it) and sent him to the box store. I was Greg Lemond. I followed his career and Tour de France ever since.




Edited by Argo44 (06/03/18 01:24 AM)
_________________________
Baluch are not Brahui, Brahui are Baluch

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#515152 - 06/03/18 01:28 AM Re: Ted Schefelbein or other Darne gurus [Re: pmag]
Ted Schefelbein Online   content
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/02/02
Posts: 7302
Loc: mpls, mn.
Gene,
Absolutely no offense was taken, we just came up on a subject I know enough about to be dangerous, and I hoped to politely correct some points that were historically inaccurate.

I am "into" this end of the bicycling spectrum. Two more photos, if I may? My "Museum" bike:



A heart stoppingly beautiful and unused version of the Raleigh Sprite, original down to the Sprite twin stripe tires and threaded Bates inner tube stems, and probably some original AIR in the tubes. 1967 also.
I ride it at the ABCE event, and have declined all offers to part with it.
It came from a thrift store I happened into one day, waiting for my wife to finish an appointment. I wish I knew how it ended up there.

The "conundrum" bike:



Also a 1967, also in beautiful condition, this is a 5 speed hub version of the Robin Hood, a loss leader version of the higher end Raleigh bikes. How someone managed to get a Robin Hood delivered with the S5 hub as original equipment (it has Sprite 5 decals and correct date codes throughout) is something none of the club members, some of them English bicycle dealers from that era, can explain.
I call it my Wife's, and she will ride it, on a sunny afternoon on a dedicated bike path. But, she is not truly a rider, and is content in her role as provider of SAG support in the F150, while my Son and I ride.
If anyone is further interested in the old English three speed bikes from (most of) our childhoods, the Sheldon Brown website is full of history, and everything you need to know on keeping them running. The English built cool bikes and guns.
My newest bike is a 1972. I am stuck in time, in an upright riding position, using obsolete bicycles, and, I'm really OK with that. Sorry for the diversion, and, I'm pretty sure I'm done now.

Best,
Ted

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