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Just plain Oatey #5. Never the after rust issues that 'acid flux' (labled as such) has shown me.
I rinse the assembly off lightly when cooled down to rid it of the sticky excess flux left behind. Nothing extensive. Warm water.
Maybe there's less of the so called acid flux in it?. I don't know, I'm not a chemist and don't pretend to be one.

Ammonimum chloride is Salamoniac,,a common at one time soft solder flux itself. But hardly anyone still uses it. Sold in a bar form like a bar of soap.
Works good as a slow rust blue rusting agent as well..that's where I've used most it in the past.

So yes they are rusting agents. Metalic salts are. Potassium chloride (corrosive primers) Sodium Chloride (common salt), Ammonium chloride (salamoniac).
Some more so than others I suspect, some rinse away easier than others maybe too.

The heat used in the soldering process may invite more agressive action of the compounds(s),,another guess on my part.
I do know that once you button up that cavity betw the ribs and the bbl's, it's free to do what it wants to and many I've taken apart because of tell tale lines of live rust at the rib/bbl solder joints showed crusty rusting and deep pitting on the inside from the use of acid flux in soldering that was not completely removed. That inspite of the 'smiths insistance that they in fact did a complete job of removal before sweat soldering. I just don't trust using the stuff. If you get fine results then it's great and chaulk it up to the ' Everyone does things a bit differently and results are what matter'.

I've never had one returned to me for a problem that I've solder/relayed.

1 member likes this: Stanton Hillis
ed good #622525 11/24/22 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by ed good
do any of you guys regulate the barrels to a specific point of aim or do you just solder them full length to the ribs and just hope for the best?

We're discussing RE-laying ribs here, ed, not building barrel assemblies from scratch. There are little spacers soldered between the barrels, between the top and bottom ribs. If they aren't messed with the regulation should not change. It has already been noted that one cannot clamp the top and bottom ribs too tightly during the process.


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happy turkey to awl!


keep it simple and keep it safe...
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my understanding is that the top rib joining of the last four inches or so to the barrels is what determines where the gun will shoot each barrel...

was curious to learn from those who have actually done rib relaying work, if they include re regulation of the gun as a necessary step in their process...

and what about the bottom filler rib? is that re attached before or after the top rib?

Last edited by ed good; 11/25/22 07:06 PM.

keep it simple and keep it safe...
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The barrels are jigged so a line tangent to the tops and bottoms of the barrels are parallel. As long as the barrels haven't been cut the muzzles are clamped and any spacers between the barrels are replaced where they were originally. The tinned top rib is placed onto the barrels as they were originally and wired with wedges to hold it in place. then the barrels are flipped over and the bottom rib is put in place. If the fore end hanger was removed it is important for the keel rib between the breech end and the fore end hanger is critical so the hanger is in the right place to get the correct bearing tension between the fore end and the action. Then the rest of the bottom rib is slid under the wires and wedged. The wedges on the top and bottom go the opposite direction to help maintain even pressure on the top and bottom. Some people put rosin un before and some after but the rosin will act as flux between the tinned barrel and ribs. With everything tight heat is applied. If using a torch, propane is hot enough. Start at the breech end, evenly hating both barrels. Wire solder is pounded flat to easily fit in the joint between the rib and barrels. It is important to apply the heat mainly to the barrels so the heat moves to the rib and not the other way. Add solder to any gaps you may see. As the solder starts to flow move toward the muzzle. It will go faster as the mettal is thinner so you have to be careful not to overheat. Gravity will flow the solder down to the bottom ribs and hanger. When everything is cool double check you don't see any pinholes Then cut all your wires and clean off any solder that is outside the joint. If you didn't have the triangle shape wedges hat filled the gaps at the muzzle put a ball of steel wool in the holes and use a solder iron to fill the void with solder. I've probably forgot something, but this is, to the best of my memory, how Mr. Dennis Potter taught me to do this. Now refinish the barrels and you are good to go.

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I like to scribe a line across the muzzle where the barrels touch before disassembly. It’s used as a index when clamping for relaying.

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I point the narrow end of the flooring nails to the breach and so if you tap them to tighten the wire it will keep the rib tight to the short breech rib,,,unless this is a chopper lump or others that have a rib from breech to muzzle you can clamp at breech end

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why not re regulate the gun during the rib relaying process...

then the workman will know that he has done all that he can to do to produce professional work...

otherwise, if it is discovered the gun does not shoot both barrels as expected, then the workman will be found at fault...

Last edited by ed good; 11/25/22 07:18 PM.

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Why look for problems that don't exist? If there was no issue with regulation before a rib relay why screw something up. If there was a problem before that's another deal altogether. ( follow Mark's advice, follow Mark's advice, follow Mark's advice)

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well, perhaps part of performing professional work is to anticapate potential problems that may surface later on...

better to check for and fix regulation problems if necessary, while the barrels are being rejoined, rather than running the risk of having to deal with an unhappy customer later on...

and if the cost of re regulation is factored in as part of the re laying job, then getting paid should be no issue...however, if the work has to be done after the fact, one may encounter difficulty in getting paid...

why not do the extra work now, impress the customer with your knowledge and professionalism, get paid for your time and expertise and create a happy cutomer, who is then likely to refer you for similar work...

i have a nice old english hammer gun that needs the ribs relayed...when choosing a smith to do the work, i would hope barrel re regulation would be offered as part of the overall project...

Last edited by ed good; 11/26/22 09:01 AM.

keep it simple and keep it safe...
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