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I would jig it up and use a mill or a carefully indexed drill press.

To me it looks broken all the way across. Through on both sides.

I guess, depending on if you were a buyer or a seller, what to do about the obvious cracks and what they really represent, is a matter of opinion.

I wouldn’t think favorably upon a person that sold me a shotgun with a stock that was broken clear through that he had hid the crack with superglue until he had my money.
But that’s just me.

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I did find those photographs of repairs that Drew posted very disconcerting by the amount of original stock wood they removed. IMHO that amount of wood removal puts pay to any further repairs in the future, I have always been in favor of "the least done soonest mended. I am more in favor of if you have to put some type of splint support in a gun stock it should be as small as possible and giving as much strength and support to the repair but reversible in the future may be. So my go to materials are Brass and stainless steel both add strength without adding bulk with stainless steel having the the least bulk of all.
I would start by opening the crack the best way I could in the photograph is a toolmakers clamp used in reverse to open a crack as far as practicable.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

Doing this you can clean out the crack removing any oil and dirt that may stop the adhesive from working properly when applied. I prefer to use slow set Epoxy adhesive because you can take your time to get the adhesive in to the whole depth of the crack to do this I use dental floss or mono filament fishing line as in the picture to pull the adhesive into and through the crack.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

As to support in the crack shown after bandaging the stock with strips of bicycle Tyre inner tube to let the adhesive set and I do give the adhesive forty eight hours to cure before assembling the gun. Then finally the support in this case I fitted a deep seated brass staple set in with epoxy to keep the crack together and stopping any further movement that might open the crack up again in the future.

[Linked Image from i.imgur.com]

This repair has proved satisfactory for a number of years now on a heavily used trap gun, also this repair could be easily removed at a future date if further travel of the crack was found all hidden under the trigger guard strap.


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Thank you for those excellent images.
Just to clarify, Trevallion's fillet repairs were performed on guns that started out in 2 pieces

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]

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Originally Posted by ClapperZapper
II wouldn’t think favorably upon a person that sold me a shotgun with a stock that was broken clear through that he had hid the crack with superglue until he had my money.
But that’s just me.

Why would you mention this within this discussion? Nobody has said anything about buying or selling a broken stock nefariously.
JR


Be strong, be of good courage.
God bless America, long live the Republic.
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Originally Posted by John Roberts
Originally Posted by ClapperZapper
II wouldn’t think favorably upon a person that sold me a shotgun with a stock that was broken clear through that he had hid the crack with superglue until he had my money.
But that’s just me.

Why would you mention this within this discussion? Nobody has said anything about buying or selling a broken stock nefariously.
JR

I've been wondering the same thing ever since I read it early this morning.


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You posted a picture of a stock that’s cracked on both sides there’s no reason to believe that they’re not connected which would make it cracked all the way through. Other posters commented on how they cover up such problems with superglue and then hide the repair.
If I were to purchase a gun that it was cracked in the manner that this one is, and the cracks were hidden with superglue, and it subsequently broke I would not be happy.

Honest repairs are, well,
HONEST

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I agree with Damascus and his techniques for cleaning a crack, getting adhesive into it, and reinforcing it. Compressed air is also good for getting glue deep into a crack, but can be messy if not done carefully. In clean sound wood, a good epoxy or good wood glue with a clean and properly prepared joint should end up as strong or even stronger than the original wood. This means that a repair in oil saturated wood will not be good, and is likely to fail at some point. Mechanical reinforcements such as pins, staples, and dowels are added to provide extra insurance where conditions are less than perfect for a good strong glue joint. Proper clamping is essential too. Debris in the joint will weaken the repair, and clamping too tight will force out too much adhesive, and starve the joint.

I might be somewhat disappointed to remove the trigger guard on a gun to find that a piece of Baltic birch plywood was epoxied into a milled recess during some past repair. But such repairs can save a broken stock from needing replacement, and are certainly much better than visible pins, dowels, or even the external metal plates, wood screws, and stove bolt repairs that are often seen. In lower grade guns, the cost of replacing a stock may often exceed the value of the gun. Every repair involves a judgement call to determine the best path. There are no One Size Fits All solutions.

I like a good epoxy for repairs that do not show on the surface. That means a high quality clear product like West Systems or Accraglas. The gray and white epoxies containing fillers have no place in repairing fine guns, although we see them used far too often. Epoxy is great because of its' strong gap filling properties when joint fit is less than perfect. Polyurethane glues are also great for gap filling because of their foaming, but they are very messy to use, and more prone to interfering with staining and finishing after the repair is done. But I still prefer using Titebond II wood glue over anything else where the repair joint will be visible on the outer surfaces. In actual side by side tests that I did several years ago to see which adhesive would give me the least visible repair joint in walnut, the Titebond II was the best when compared with a couple different epoxies, polyurethane (Gorilla) glue. etc. My own tests were inspired by the wonderful work done to save broken stocks by guys like David Trevallion and Dennis Earl Smith (The Stock Doctor). I wanted to learn how they were able to repair shattered stocks in a manner that was often nearly undetectable. I later broke my test pieces in a vise, and found that my Titebond II glue joints were stronger than the surrounding wood. I was applying shear forces by striking the edge of my walnut blocks with a hammer in an attempt to break the glue joint. Cyanoacrylate (Crazy) glues are very strong in tension, i.e. resisting being pulled apart, but prone to failure under shear forces. Shear forces are encountered in gunstocks quite often, from things like recoil, a loose action hammering the front of the stock, or dropping a gun on the butt and breaking a piece of the toe.


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Originally Posted by Clapper Zapper
Other posters commented on how they cover up such problems with superglue and then hide the repair.
If I were to purchase a gun that it was cracked in the manner that this one is, and the cracks were hidden with superglue, and it subsequently broke I would not be happy.

Honest repairs are, well, HONEST


Super glue doesn't hide the repair. It is a MEANS of repair. Sanding in finish hides it. Hiding a repair does not, in spite of what you may think, imply unethetical intent. You're the only one who found reason for unethical intent in the use of it.

Would you kindly explain how repairing a crack and leaving it visible on the outside is more ethical?

And one more thing ................ by your term "other posters", then misrepresenting my description with your use of the term "cover up", you have implied in a back-handed manner that I would intentionally hide a repair from a potential buyer. That is reprehensible, inaccurate and highly insulting. You owe an apology, but given your propensity for argument in the past I doubt you will admit it.

Last edited by Stanton Hillis; 02/01/22 08:04 AM.

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Nice pics Damascus but I'm seeing a different crack than he has.....

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This is rather an interesting point about a hidden repair, I have over a long time repaired many stock problems from the stock being in pieces to scratch removal. But in all the repairs I have done I have never been told to make the repair noticeable ever! May be it is the case of I am paying for the repair so I want the best repair possible. That put the onus on me to produce the best work and if that means hiding my repair because of professional pride I will do it and have done it having no thoughts what will happen to the gun when I handed it over to the paying customer. As they say in the repair business "the customer is always right."


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