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Joined: Jan 2003
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bellasm Offline OP
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I read a thread from 6 years ago,on this bbs, about best options for clear lacquer to protect case colors. Oscar Gaddy told me over 20 years ago that he used Behlens. That being said I read that another member used this exact product and found that it softened and failed with the G-96 3 in 1 product; the oil that I use. In the aforementioned thread, Dewey Vicknair said that he used Minwax Brushing Lacquer as well as Ace Hardware Instant Spray Lacquer. My question is has anyone found these to soften with a 3 in 1 product? I also see that some lacquers state that they contain a catalyst. Does this mean it acts more like an epoxy finish or do all lacquers contain a catalyst for curing? Thanks and I look forward to the responses.

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The simple, one step lacquers are all going to fail, eventually, from gun cleaners and lubricants. The good news is they clean right off with lacquer thinner, and you can reapply them. I used Krylon artists spray clear on a Nitro Special, and it has held up pretty well the last few years. It soaks right off if you are so inclined. On my gun, the finish is a bit uneven, but, I just wanted to protect the 80 year old colors, and it has done that. All I can ask, from a rattle can, really. I always strip the gun down to bits when I spray one, and mask off where it shouldn’t be.
Brownell’s at one time sold a baking lacquer, you sprayed it out of a commercial paint sprayer, let it cure, and then bake it in an oven. I did an R10 Darne with the stuff, superb product that is tough as nails, if a bit glossy. Bet if you tried to take it off, the cyanide colors on the R10 would come right along with it. When I have come across a finish that doesn’t seem to want to come off, on metal parts, my last Hail Mary attempt is with regular, Berryman dip type carburetor cleaner. It does not damage case colors if you don’t scrub at it. Stinky, high toxicity stuff, outdoors, wearing a face shield and rubber gauntlets. Your safe yearly exposure level to methylene chloride is actually zero, and you will be getting a good dose with this stuff.
I have used catalyzed automotive clears on many things in the past. Same thing, tough, might be a problem getting it off, actually, but, these are pretty toxic products and processes, and not really for amateurs. Your garden variety Remington guns had a similar finish on the wood back in the 60s-70s that most folks are familiar with, the stuff is tough, and tougher to remove.
Many guys just wipe Tru-Oil wood finish on the metal, let it harden up, and reapply when it is gone. I’ve never done that, but, have seen good reports, here, from guys that have. I’d mostly be afraid of it working into the action and gumming things up, but, you should be able to very lightly coat the outside surfaces, if you are careful.

Good luck.

Best,
Ted

______________________________________________________________________________
Detroit smells like Berryman’s. Actually, Berryman’s with wiener dog poo-poo in it.

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OK, Ted, I'm up for the Tru-Oil, because I've used it for years on wood. How should I apply it? Fingertips, artist brush? I'm leaning toward fingertips because of the control I would have on thickness of coats. Thanks for your reply.

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brownells also had/has an air dry lacquer that I tried once and didn't like the color it imparted to the case color. Now I use, sparingly, Tru Oil and it works great.

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Oscar used Byln (sp)
bill

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I clean with acetone and use Tru-oil, thinned, and applied with bird finger, just because it seems to work the best. And, as suggested, easy to remove or touch up! Gil


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Gil, is that a bird feather? If not which bird finger? Middle might give longest coverage but with people being upset about everything I might go for another.

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Originally Posted by KY Jon
Gil, is that a bird feather? If not which bird finger? Middle might give longest coverage but with people being upset about everything I might go for another.

I think he probably meant "Bird Finger"...

...and as you apply the Tru-Oil with your Bird Finger, you keep saying, "Let's go Brandon...Let's go Brandon... F**k Joe Biden..."

Bill Shodlatz is most likely referring to Behlen Lacquer as the product Oscar Gaddy used. It is still available, but getting harder to find under the Behlen name. Behlen finishes are now marketed as Mohawk.

[Linked Image from i.postimg.cc]

I had thought about using the catalyzed automotive urethane clear coat as Ted mentioned earlier, but it would take something like a methylene Chloride paint remover to remove if it became scratched or dull. Methylene Chloride strippers have been banned, so it is getting harder to find the stuff, and it should only be used outdoors with caution. And any clear coat product is going to get dulled, scratched, and worn over time, so it may be wise to use a clear coat product that can be easily be removed without damaging the case colors in the process. I'm happy with nothing more than a good non-abrasive paste wax. I will say that G-96 3-in-1 oil must have a pretty strong solvent carrier if it softens lacquer. I'd be concerned about getting any on my wood stock finishes. All Lacquers do not utilize a catalyst for curing, but those that are catalyzed are tougher and will take more abuse. They will also be harder to remove if and when the time comes.


A true sign of mental illness is any gun owner who would vote for an Anti-Gunner like Joe Biden.

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Originally Posted by eightbore
OK, Ted, I'm up for the Tru-Oil, because I've used it for years on wood. How should I apply it? Fingertips, artist brush? I'm leaning toward fingertips because of the control I would have on thickness of coats. Thanks for your reply.

I noted above, I have never used Tru-Oil. I’m just parroting what some of the older regulars here have told me.

Best,
Ted

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bellasm Offline OP
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Thanks for all of the info gentlemen. I reached out to Turnbull Restorations to find out what they use as they have sprayed all of my restored guns, even Parkers, in order to protect the colors. They had told me that they have used Behlen Violin Lacquer, which is not being sold any more as Behlen was sold to Mohawk Finishing.
I recently purchased an L.C. Smith Ideal grade with a lot of original case color and would like to protect it. I am going to use it as a hunting gun and would like to do it myself rather than send it out. At this point I am leaning towards a 50/50 mixture of lacquer and lacquer thinner and spraying it. I know that this is how it is applied at Turnbull's and it always looks flawless.

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