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#602209 09/02/21 06:33 AM
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Searching the new LC Smith Collectors Asso page I noticed the tech link (I think that is what it was) is missing. I was looking for the link that showed various ways to reassemble the trigger plate and manipulate the lever. My saved links no longer work. There was one in particular that did not require drilling a hole through the stock. Can anybody help.

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Post on the LC collectors site.

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The site was updated and FAQs revised; hopefully improved by the fella doing the work wink
Look at the bottom here under "Disassembly and Reassembly" for several techniques
https://lcsca.clubexpress.com/content.aspx?page_id=274&club_id=43784

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This subject comes up often enough that I have to wonder how many L.C. Smith shotguns are sitting in a cigar box in a state of partial disassrmbly, because someone who shouldn't have attempted it did so anyway. I remember a sign posted at a local gunsmiths shop that listed the labor cost per hour, and a price double that for people who attempted to fix their gun, and botched the job.

I also can't believe that any sane person would even consider a method of re-installing an L.C. Smith top lever against the considerable pressure of the return spring, which involved drilling a hole in the stock. If such an extreme method is actually posted on the L.C. Smith collectors, website, it would be irresponsible to not delete it. I prefer the method that doesn't require the use of any tools, fixtures, slave pins, etc., that was probably used by the assemblers who were employed by Hunter Arms. Co. People who do something hundreds of times a month tend to find the most efficient ways.


A true sign of mental illness is any gun owner who would vote for an Anti-Gunner like Joe Biden.

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Thank you Mr Hause, exactly what I was looking for.

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Nick Makinson's excellent tutorial is now on youtube
He demonstrates the Hunter Arms tool and technique at 22 min

[Linked Image from photos.smugmug.com]


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Very interesting video. Thanks for posting. Are his other videos available?

Last edited by susjwp; 09/14/21 08:07 AM.
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When I worked at Marlin in the Repair Dept , early 70's, I was shown by 2 employees there who had been there when the LCS was still in production.

They placed the bbls on the action and clamped the bbl'd action upside down in the vise,,action overhanging the vise.
The top lever was already assembled into the action and attached to the yoke.

The trigger plate w/triggers was placed onto the bottom of the action and positioned so that the Safety was correctly engaged.
The front and rear trigger plate screws were inserted and tightened up, BUT just enough to hold the plate in the correct position and give it a bit of 'bowed' pressure
over the still disengaged top lever spindle.
That top lever spindle will be just off center from it's hole in the trigger lever plate due to it's engagement with it's heavy V spring in the frame.

To get the Spindle over, a straight shanked small dia punch is inserted into the screw hole in the bottom of the spindle.
Sometimes you have to first use a tapered shank to move it over enough against the spring tension so you can get the straight shank punch inserted.
The straight shank punch is used so it affords the greatest strength in the small dia screw hole (4-40) and won't tilt on you in the next step.

With the trigger plate positioned correctly, the punch inserted and slight pressure now pushing downward at the point where the spindle will enter the trigger plate,
place a small cloth across the bottom of the action to avoid scratches (they used to simply use their work apron).

A screwdriver with a wide flat blade and a V filed into it was placed against the punch.
The 'handle' of the screwdriver was placed against your stomach.
Some had an extra large handle on the driver more like a small bitbrace handle to afford better control,,and it was more comfortable to use for us smaller guys.

Now both hands are free.

Right handed,,,your right hand thumb presses on the trigger plate to the right of the punch while your fingers reach around the bottom and hold the spindle from falling back out from position once engaged in the trigger plate
Your left hand thumb presses lightly down on the screwdriver blade to help guide it as you push it and the spindle into position. Your left hand fingers are gripping around the action and bbls .
You have everything securely under control.

You use your body/stomach strength to push the screwdriver/punch forward that small amt to line up the spindle with the hole in the plate.
When it's in allaignment, the spindle will 'snap' into place from the slight tension of the bowed trigger plate above and the constant finger pressure on the top lever from below from your right hand fingers.
You can watch the whole thing very clearly as you are pushing the spindle via the punch & driver. There's no nervous moments, no need to rush or panic.

Once the spindle snaps in place hold it there in place from below and run the screw into position..
If you don't support it, you can often push it right back out from engagement from that V spring again.

The Nick Mackinson/Hunter Arms tool & technique is about the same from the looks of the pic.
It just doesn't use the action screws for tension nor your stomach to push the pin into place.

There are often a few different ways to do these things and the factory assemblers and repair people came up with them after a lot of experience working with the guns.
Sometimes factories would have special tools or methods advised in manuals but then other easier or expedient ways evolved as more familiarity was gained.

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Kutter,

It has been mentioned before, but let me repeat: you consistently add a wealth of knowledge and experience to this site and novices like me greatly appreciate it. How many old time LC smiths were there at Marlin back then in CT? They must all have passed on by now.

Thanks,

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Originally Posted by susjwp
Kutter,

It has been mentioned before, but let me repeat: you consistently add a wealth of knowledge and experience to this site and novices like me greatly appreciate it. How many old time LC smiths were there at Marlin back then in CT? They must all have passed on by now.

Thanks,

Thank You..
At that time ('72,73) only 2.
-John Miller who was in his mid 60's at that time . He showed me the most about the LCS in the Repair Dept.
-Larry Sisson . He was in his middle 70's already at that time and only working part time because he was collecting S/S.,could only earn so much..
Larry was a true mentor. Worked all of his life in the Ct gun industry. Started at Winchester before WW1 when he was 14. Talk about an encyclopedia of knowledge.

Marlin was at that same time putting out the 'New LCS' .
That 'new at the time' LCS was fairly close to the orig in design but had quite a few changes for mfg and assembly expediancy.
Neither of the above gentlemen wanted anything to do with the gun. Hot blued bbls w/ glued on alloy ribs . Hastily bedded stocks done with hardware store quality epoxy.

Those were assembled by just a couple of the regular line assembly people,,IIRC they were off of the C/Fire Lever Action assembly line,
They would do up LCS's a couple AM's a week, that was about all. Maybe M,W & F (?) We worked a 1/2 day on Sat as well so I may have the schedule mixed up but it wasn't a full time production like the rest of the guns were.
They had to allow time for the epoxy to set on the stocks and bbl rib sets they were working on.

Marlin had problems with the bbls. More than few split open upon firing at the breech. There was a bunch of the damaged ones returned by customers safely stored in a locked chainlinked fenced area in the parts loft over the mfg floor.
There were other Ka-Boom guns in there as well.
We could see them but not get at them to handle them of course.
Stocks splitting was another complaint,

The amt of orig older Marlin and LCS parts they had was amazing. All packed, factory numbered and carried up from the NewHaven plant in the move to North Haven in '68.
Not much was ever done with them. Most requests to repair older guns were finally rejected on the excuse that 'no parts were available' inspite of truck loads of them in every sort of phase of mfg.
Lots of raritys too.
But management saw no $$ in repairing the older stuff, so that phase was going away. The LCS repair of orig mfg guns from the general public was slowing to a stop as well. Brophy saw to that.
Repairing that 'new' LCS they were stuck with.

Many of those old parts eventually sold to a few people with an 'in' with someone in management I was told.
Most went to Numrich over the years.

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