December
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
Who's Online Now
4 members (DaveB, graybeardtmm3, LRF, Glacierjohn), 84 guests, and 2 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Forum Statistics
Forums10
Topics36,372
Posts511,050
Members14,103
Most Online462
Aug 5th, 2016
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3
#599674 07/16/21 10:27 AM
Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 38
Likes: 2
rwarren Offline OP
Sidelock
OP Offline
Sidelock

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 38
Likes: 2
I have seen threads here talking about painting stocks. Might be to dress up poor wood or to repair the looks of a damaged area. I have a small spot on a stock I’m working on that I would like to try something like this on. It is a bark inclusion that I have filled and looks pretty good but would like to try and improve it. Is what I am wondering is what paint is used to do this type of repair? Seems like most paint would lay on top the wood and am thinking this would be tough to deal with.
Thanks

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,870
Likes: 23
Sidelock
**
Offline
Sidelock
**

Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,870
Likes: 23
rwarren,
I may be wrong( I often am), but I think that when this type work is done to improve the grain, stains that penetrate are used, rather than a paint.
Mike

Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 6,378
Likes: 105
SKB Online Content
Sidelock
**
Online Content
Sidelock
**

Joined: Dec 2001
Posts: 6,378
Likes: 105
Both techniques can be used.

It is not paint but pigment added to finish. The finish must be an on top of the wood finish, not an oil finish. Start with Pro-custom and powdered pigments from your artist supply in a multitude of colors.


http://www.bertramandco.com/

ACGG Professional metalsmith, firearms import services.
Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 7,544
Likes: 38
Sidelock
***
Offline
Sidelock
***

Joined: Jan 2002
Posts: 7,544
Likes: 38
You may enjoy checking out Mark Larson's website: <https://www.marklarsongunart.com/>

...Geo

1 member likes this: WRE1
Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,710
Likes: 27
Sidelock
***
Offline
Sidelock
***

Joined: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,710
Likes: 27
All of the above can be used. Depends on what the job is,,the wood,, the repair if any. What finish is already on the wood, what is going over it. .
Stain can be used especially solvent based stains to enhance grain and add to it.
A repair in the wood will usually still show with the use of just a stain. It's just natural that the different piece of wood and any glue line no matter how careful the repair will accept any stain differently than the base wood around it.

Color in the finish, toned finish I guess it called, works very well in some instances where the colors co-operate with you.

Paint can be used but the application is the key. Very light coats,,an air brush is often used to advantage and it's ability to feather the edges of the color layers is not to be overlooked.

Brush application techniques are something to be learned along with the ultra thin coats.
I've settled on using acrylic paints. They dry fast and can be applied so thin that one will show thru others to create the needed look.
It's not just a couple of colors mixed and applied and that's it.

When completed, the color repair needs to be 'fixed' with a durable transparent overcoating. This can be toned with a colorant as well to comply with the final finish if needed..
Then the real finish is applied over than to match the rest of the stock. Or perhaps the entire stock is being refinished along with the repair(s).

Here's Win21 that needed the stock refinished but had a missing piece of wood by the frame.
The orig repair was a glob of fiberglas.
I fitted a new piece of walnut and fiberglassed it into place. Fitted close but the 'glass still shows at a couple spots along the glue lines.
No matter, the epoxy is strong and hard and won't flex like a resin glue line so the repair won't show.
The wood doesn't need to match in color or grain as it is being sealed over first,,then painted to mimic the color and grain of the orig wood,,then 'fixed' with another sealer,,then the final finish.

The slight foggy look to the repair is the final coloring done, but no fix applied. That will brighten and match the color area with the rest of the surrounding wood. Then the final finish applied to the entire stock/
That final look I unfortunately can not find the pic of. But you can get the idea I think.

This is only one way to do this.
Like most everything else in this business,,there are many ways to the end result. Techniques vary and what ever works for you to get those results is the path to take.
It takes a lot of experimentation, time & effort,,, failed efforts.

[Linked Image from i.ibb.co]
Stock with a repair piece epoxied into place, shaped and sanded. I think I had applied a sealer at this point.

[Linked Image from i.ibb.co]
Building up the color and the look of the grain with the acrylic paint. Brush techniques are used to get the right looks. No Airbrush used, just cheap artists brushes. I clip them to different shapes and lengths to give different effects.

[Linked Image from i.ibb.co]
Coloring (painting) pretty much completed. It gets a very light going over with 0000 steel wool after a complete drying for a day or so.
That will blend the edges of the coloring into the natural wood grain/uncolored areas well.
Then the very light coating of 'fixer'.
I apply that with a brush.
It can be anything from thinned shellac (orange or white) to a wiping varnish, ect.
Something that drys hard and fairly quick. Nothing with a linseed oil in it as I have found that will start to soften the acrylic colors, mix and blurr them.
It can be used over the fixed coating however as the colors are then protected.

Well that's the way I fix up repairs in wood. But like I said there's lots of ways to do it and results are what count.
There are some artists that can make a piece of appliance crate wood look like a blank of English thats suitable for a Purdey.

4 members like this: Ghostrider, battle, HomelessjOe, Woodreaux
Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 103
Sidelock
*
Offline
Sidelock
*

Joined: Mar 2019
Posts: 103
Kutter-very nice write-up. Thanks again for your input. Check your pms.

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 38
Likes: 2
rwarren Offline OP
Sidelock
OP Offline
Sidelock

Joined: Feb 2010
Posts: 38
Likes: 2
Thanks everyone.
Kutter, that’s an amazing repair! This is a new stock that showed no issues when I started shaping it but as I got down close to the finished surface I ran into this bark inclusion. I filled it and it isn’t really all that bad, just looks like a solid knot, but thought it might be nice to camouflage it a bit more. The wood has just one coat of red oil, made with blo, on it. It will be finished with an oil but not blo. The acrylic paint you use? Is it artists paint you get from an art store? Thanks for a very nice writeup.

Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 358
Likes: 18
Sidelock
***
Offline
Sidelock
***

Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 358
Likes: 18
Thanks for another great post Kutter.


Jim
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 997
Likes: 22
Sidelock
***
Offline
Sidelock
***

Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 997
Likes: 22
The traditional paint used by stock makers to hide all sorts of filling and blemishes is Artist's Oil paint. I have found the following colours cover all my needs by mixing, Ivory Black, Vandyke Brown, Burnt Umber< Vermilion, most of the pigments in these oil paints are Earth co lours so very stable. You can purchase a large number of additives to speed up drying and making the paint translucent or very thick from a good Art suppler, this type of traditional artist colours mix well with oil based stock finishes or just Linseed oil. Acrylic paints in the same colours can dry much faster and some can be added to Alcohol to make a fast drying stain.


The only lessons in my life I truly did learn from where the ones I paid for!
Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 2,894
Sidelock
***
Offline
Sidelock
***

Joined: Aug 2003
Posts: 2,894
Kutter great job on a 21. Bobby

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3

Link Copied to Clipboard

doublegunshop.com home | Welcome | Sponsors & Advertisers | DoubleGun Rack | Doublegun Book Rack

Order or request info | Other Useful Information

Updated every minute of everyday!


Copyright (c) 1993 - 2021 doublegunshop.com. All rights reserved. doublegunshop.com - Bloomfield, NY 14469. USA These materials are provided by doublegunshop.com as a service to its customers and may be used for informational purposes only. doublegunshop.com assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions in these materials. THESE MATERIALS ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANT-ABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR NON-INFRINGEMENT. doublegunshop.com further does not warrant the accuracy or completeness of the information, text, graphics, links or other items contained within these materials. doublegunshop.com shall not be liable for any special, indirect, incidental, or consequential damages, including without limitation, lost revenues or lost profits, which may result from the use of these materials. doublegunshop.com may make changes to these materials, or to the products described therein, at any time without notice. doublegunshop.com makes no commitment to update the information contained herein. This is a public un-moderated forum participate at your own risk.

Note: The posting of Copyrighted material on this forum is prohibited without prior written consent of the Copyright holder. For specifics on Copyright Law and restrictions refer to: http://www.copyright.gov/laws/ - doublegunshop.com will not monitor nor will they be held liable for copyright violations presented on the BBS which is an open and un-moderated public forum.

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5
(Release build 20201027)
Responsive Width:

PHP: 7.0.33-0+deb9u11+hw1 Page Time: 0.052s Queries: 37 (0.029s) Memory: 0.8628 MB (Peak: 1.8992 MB) Data Comp: Off Server Time: 2021-12-04 23:31:11 UTC
Valid HTML 5 and Valid CSS