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Now that the inner case sides are temporary fitted into place this is now giving the exact size of the case we have to work in, it is the barrel section dividers that are next to be made. Though as well as the dividers we have also to construct the barrel mounts that hold the barrels level in the case, also limiting that barrel movement that causes an annoying rattle when the case is carried. The next two photographs show how to fit the barrels vertically in their compartments, it may look a little crude but it is the best way I have found how to get it right first time when you come to make the barrel mounting blocks. The mounting blocks are to set the barrel level in the case along its length, they also make the difference between the barrel looking as if it has just been dropped in and the case fitting it.




Once you are satisfied that the barrels are sitting level and at the correct height we can now make the two sets of mounting blocks using the total height of the temporary height adjusters we have used. Now because both barrels are the same bore and the only difference is the length all the blocks can be made at the same time, though the shorter barrel muzzle block is quite different from the longer barrel.






The mounting blocks on the left of the photograph are for the breach end of the barrels, the muzzle mounting blocks are extreme right and lower centre.




The two upper centre blocks are also barrel mounting blocks but these are only needed for this design of barrel fitting, they are needed to stabilise the crooked barrel partition.




I hope this makes the use of the barrel mounting blocks more clear. At this point I should mention that there is very little difference between the mounting blocks if you wish to mount a barrel horizontally, obviously they are wider and the block at the barrel breach has two small blocks with the gap between them to allow the lumps to pass between so they support the barrel on its flats. Their height etc. is adjusted accordingly to have the barrel sitting level in the case.






This is one of the major reasons that vertical mounting of barrels in cases is not seen all that often, because of the need to use of bent dividers. They look that they can be problematical to make but using my method rather than separate pieces, it will be far easier than you may think. Now because the layout of barrel and fore ends seem never to be the same I can not give any measurements for their construction but as you will see that will not matter.







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I think I would have used three screw corners, which would not sit as proud, and put the third screw into the barrel mounting blocks in each corner.


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Hmmm oldstarfire you would screw in to the barrel mounting blocks on each corner? Now I feel that I should point out that the case has eight corners. So far so good! But only four of them have barrel blocks. The other four are the lid agreed! So why would it have blocks to screw into there I am sure it would pose a problem when you tried to close the case with four blocks of wood in the way dont you think?

In the photograph is a vintage leather and oak gun case with original proud fitting military corners, so I have done nothing ground breakingly new. Though that case I restored did have a rather thick wooden lid able to take a centre screw which is a far cry from the case I am working on at the moment with just hardboard. So let's keep to I will do the thinking and doing and you will carry on with the reading!!!




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Damascus,

Thanks for this. I wanted on several occasions to take on such a project but hesitated because I had no idea where to begin. You have provided a road map.

John

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I suppose a better description for the type of dividers used in this case should be cranked rather than bent but I suppose it is how you look at them. The principal of making them is very simple though can be disconcerting at the same time you are making them, it is a method called cut and crack. Firstly, you decide where each bend should emanate from and draw a line at each change of direction point. This line must be at a right angle to the divider bottom, failure to keep to this will result in a case divider that will not sit level on a flat surface. Now just some important does to remember, the one I have just mentioned mark at a right angle and the other is you always with no exception cut along the line on the opposite side of the divider to the direction of the bend lastly cut should be no deeper than half the woods thickness.




For the cut I use a rather old dovetail saw because I have one and I find it comfortable to use and it produces the correct width cut though a standard hacksaw will work just as well, do not use a standard tenon saw because width of the cut I find is far too wide. The one piece of advice on measurement I can give you is the first bend is always started a little way past the barrel breach block end.






Now place the wood over the edge of a table with the saw cut uppermost and push down on the free end, it will make some cracking noises but only aim to form half of the desired bend only this is to let the wood fibres get comfortable in their new position after about a quarter of an hour push down again to your chosen angle. If you take your time and don’t over work the bend you will be surprised how stable this bend will be after you finish, though it is on the fragile side until we make the bend in the wood permanent.



My preferred method is to fill the saw cut with an Epoxy Resin Adhesive with an inert filler I use slate dust only because I have some, failing making your own adhesive filler motor vehicle body filler works well. When the filler is set, I use an abrasive paper on a flat block to smooth it to shape. After the divider is covered with Baize the bends give that look of a smooth transition of direction.



I did the first shaping around the fore end using the divider for the shorter barrel because it was easier to move around in the case, when I was happy with the shape, I transferred the first foot or so of the breach end shape to a piece of card as a template so it could be re set if things were accidently moved. Also this template shape is the same for both barrel dividers because they are Identical at the breach, just their length is different.

















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Last edited by oldstarfire; 11/10/18 07:00 PM. Reason: NWTA

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Ernie,
This is the best thing I have found on this BBS in some time!! thank you for doing this.

PML

Last edited by PL; 11/10/18 11:16 PM.
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Brilliant tutorial. Thanks

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It is now time to fit the case new inner sides, now because of the design constraints the Baize must be fitted first to the short section of the new side that will be next to the original case walls. It must also cover the pencil line I mentioned earlier and butt up to the card. Now for strength I used a Contact Adhesive to fit the Baize to this narrow section, there is a good reason for this because once the sides are fitted to the case the Baize appears between the original and new case sides. Once the sides are permanently glued to the original case using PVA Adhesive and this Baize pulls out for whatever reason it will be some disaster, I do trust the grip of a contact Adhesive over PVA in the short term better safe than sorry.



I fitted the new case rear wood first because it is difficult to clamp things together while the glue dries, I used propping pieces from the case front to keep things held together.



The case front was next, because the original case plywood was so flexible, I did not use traditional carpenters G clamps to hold things together because of their weight also they have quite an overhang that is liable to pull the case front out of line. I used instead clamps that are more at home in metal working with a distinct advantage that the weight of the clamp is near vertical when using them so no danger pf pulling things out of line. Fixing the two sides into pace finished things off, making quite a difference in the cases unwanted flexibility. When the Adhesive has dried holding all the internal side pieces starting with the two long sides brush a generous amount of PVA on the wood, then fold down the baize making sure you rub firmly to make sure it in in contact with the Adhesive. It helps in corners to snip the Baize in the direction of the corner to help relive tension and fit correctly. I use the handle end of a desert spoon to push the Baize into the long corners. When the Adhesive had dried sufficiently repeat for the short sides.



Things should look like this!! Nearly forgot to mention I do prefer to use a disposable craft knife with a snap off blade and also scissors with sharp points. for trimming the Baize.









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Damascus,

Whats your source for the baize? i have found some nice stuff not bad priced in the past but more recently having been able to find anything reasonable? Feel free to PM me! I have a few jobs where i could do with some shortly!

Also how are you attaching the baize to wood? Ive used spray on contact adhesive, but you either seem to get too much stuff stuck or not enough and once you get it on your fingers you mark up all the baize...

Thoughts and wisdom appreciated!

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