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Joined: Feb 2002
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Sidelock
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Drew

I do not believe that I have seen such prominent ribband welds or maybe it is a photographic effect??

Berrien

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The distinct weld lines are a variant of "Rosen" pattern

Hemenway's New Model



Remington Three Iron "Oxford 4 S.J.". The 'zipper' and straight welds are quite clear



And since it is springtime here in Paradise smile

Rosa damascene


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Took a bit to find this Belgian Pinfire with 'Horseshoe". Interestingly, every weld line is a 'zipper' weld, which Steve Culver could no doubt 'splain. Also note the prominent black & white 'Stars', BLACK BEING THE STEEL AND WHITE, THE IRON AFTER STAINING


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Wallace H. Coxe, in "Smokeless Shotgun Powders: Their Development, Composition and Ballistic Characteristics" published by E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. in 1927 and 1931 cites a study in which a fluid steel barrel was cut to 9” and capped, then a series of progressively increasing pressure loads fired. The barrel cap was blown off and barrel burst at 5,600 psi.

Keith: the barrel was from a "12-gauge pressure gun which was equipped with piston for recording pressures". No mention of wall thickness.

This is interesting.

"Measurement of Pressures"
The common method of taking pressures in small arms in this country is known as the Radial Pressure system. A housing is built around the barrel, and a hole drilled through the housing and barrel into the chamber at a distance of 1 inch from the breech and at right angles to the axis of the bore. The hole is then bushed and drilled to a uniform diameter of 0.2250 inch. Then a piston is made the length of the piston hole and 0.2250 inch in diameter. Next the piston hole is lapped to permit the piston to fit snugly without either sticking or getting out of alignment.
In firing the gauge, the piston is inserted and seated, then a lead crusher cylinder is placed on the head of the piston and held firmly in place by a screw and anvil attachment built into the housing. When the cartridge is fired, a portion of the same gas pressure that pushes the bullet through the barrel drives the piston against the lead cylinder and compresses it.
The length of the lead crusher cylinder after compression is naturally less than before the shot was fired and the difference between the original length and the length after compression therefore represents the amount of pressure which has acted upon the lead. Thee exact pressure is read from a table giving a pressure reading for every remaining length reading and commonly called a Tarage Table.
Pressures that are determined at ballistic laboratories are merely relative values and are not absolute values.

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Originally Posted By: Drew Hause
BLACK BEING THE STEEL AND WHITE, THE IRON AFTER STAINING


That is exactly the opposite of what I would have thought. Interesting.

SRH


Drinking from my saucer, 'cause my cup has overflowed .......
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Boy this must have been good stuff!! whistle

The J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. No. 105, 107 & 115 singles were listed with “Electro Steel” in 1901. In 1902 the No. 180 hammerless single had “Special Pyro-Electro Steel”.



The Iron Age, April 1902
https://books.google.com/books?id=xqM-AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA9-PA65&lpg

The first electric arc furnace was developed by Paul Héroult, of France, in 1900. Héroult came to the U.S. in 1905 and Halcomb Steel Co. installed the first electric arc furnace in the U.S. in 1906 (4 years after the Stevens ad smile )
Blast Furnace and Steel Plant, November 1922
https://books.google.com/books?id=ad0fAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA542&lpg
Electrically refined steel, or electric steel, or electro steel was reported to allow a higher carbon content with less sulfur and phosphorus compared to Crucible or Open Hearth process steel.
The Horseless Age, Dec. 14 1910
https://books.google.com/books?id=DKONYWNYDqIC&pg=PA813&lpg
Chilton’s Automotive Industries, January 12 1911
https://books.google.com/books?id=sB1HAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA137&dq

Sanderson Brothers Steel Co. installed an arc furnace in 1907. This furnace is now on display at Station Square, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

I'm thinking the "pyro" & "electro" part came from Stevens' marketing dept. wink

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The many c. 1919 Hunter Arms Fulton Tradename guns no doubt win the prize for the most, if not the most creative, names stamped on the (no doubt) same barrels smile :
“Royal Steel”, “Special Smokeless Steel”, “London Fluid Steel”, “Peerless Steel”, “Fluid Blued Steel”, “Projectile Steel”, “Silver Steel”, “Missabe Fluid Steel”, and “Blue Diamond Steel”.
http://www.picturetrail.com/sfx/album/view/17126039

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The underlying fact that a shotgun may explode in the shooter's face with each shot only serves to bolster the calamitous spirit that is the very essence of shotgunning. When super-duper steels were introduced and the risk abated, we all died a little.

The Top 5 developments which have ruined shotgunning:

1) Chokes
2) Smokeless powder
3) Super-duper steels
4) The recoil pad
5) Patterning

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I'm glad those are only hypothetical reasons that " we all died a little ". Also the " calamitous spirit of shotgunning " or a " shotgun may explode in a shooters face ". Me thinks you wrote everything in jest, or tongue in cheek.

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Quote:
Interestingly, every weld line is a 'zipper' weld, which Steve Culver could no doubt 'splain.


The barrel with all zig-zag (zipper) welds is indeed interesting. A we have discussed before, the zipper welds are caused by forge welding together twisted rods of damascus. The corners of the formerly square rods, create spiraling ridges around the twisted rods, appearing similar to threads on a bolt. Forge welding the twisted rods together, drives these “threads” into one another, creating the zipper weld lines.

As we also know, it is typical that a number of twisted rods are first forge welded together to make a riband. The connections between the twisted rods display the zipper welds. Whereas at the edges of the riband, the hammer blows to weld the rods together flatten the threadlike ridges and create a flat surface. This flattened surface become the straight weld lines between the turns of riband in the forge welded barrel tube.

This barrel tube does not display the straight weld lines. It is obviously made up of alternating right twisted and left twisted rods. It very much looks as though the barrel smith wound at least two twisted rods on the mandrel, without first welding them into a riband. This is entirely possible to do. Every smith is his own man, not constrained to do the work as everyone else. I suspect that he flattened the twisted rods on two sides, to make it easier to wind them on the mandrel. But, we’ll never know for sure. I guess the take-away here, is to not be surprised at anything you find.

Quote:
BLACK BEING THE STEEL AND WHITE, THE IRON AFTER STAINING


I’m also curious about the statement that Drew posted. I’ve seen it before. Where did it come from, Brother Drew?


Steve Culver
Steve Culver Knives
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