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mind your hair/beard too, if your an old hippie like myself smile
franc

Last edited by Franc Otte; 03/26/14 05:10 PM.
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Ken61 Offline OP
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I'm pretty sure that the two guns I saw were plated, not merely polished. I run into both polished and blued receivers on LC's fairly often.

Thanks for the lathe advice and encouragement. My father bought this lathe probably 30 years ago and never set it up. It was an antique then, so you can imagine what it looks like. It's fairly small, it would easily mount on a dresser top, and the motor is external with a v-belt going to the lathe. I just have to take the time to set it up.


I prefer wood to plastic, leather to nylon, waxed cotton to Gore-Tex, and split bamboo to graphite.
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Room around the lathe, good light, no nearby distractions and no loud music or radio when you are starting out. Things happen fast on a lathe if you are not paying attention. Also the sound of the lathe will tell you a lot about how what you are turning is doing. When you are learning a good stock of "soft" metal is great to learn with. I love turning brass stock but aluminum is often cheap to play with. Some of the stainless steels are a pain to turn at first.

Ebay use to be a good place to buy scrap metal stock but now I buy more local stuff. When I go back east I look at my fathers machine shop scarp bin and take what I need or think I need. I pay the scrap metal price for it so no one thinks I am just taking the cream of the scrap. All his employees can buy surplus or scrap metal at the scrap price if the ask. A metal lathe can be addictive so be careful.

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Ken61 Offline OP
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I'm fortunate to live only around ten minutes from the area scrap yard. I've got a pretty good relationship with them, I always make sure I pay a little over market whenever I scrounge up materials for one of my projects..


I prefer wood to plastic, leather to nylon, waxed cotton to Gore-Tex, and split bamboo to graphite.
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Atlas made a small bench lathe for many years & it used to be sold by Sears. They also published a very good basic instruction book, probably the equal of the South bend one as I recall. Either the Atlas or the small South Bends are good home lathes, but if any one thinks they are "Fine" they've never run a Monarch or Hardinge etc. I have a South Bend myself at home.


Miller/TN
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Since everyone is giving advice, I'll add this.When learning, the hardest but most important thing to master is to center the cutting tool on the work.I tried a lot of methods until an old machinist told me to pinch a scale(or other slip of metal) between the tool and the work.If it is vertical,the tool is centered;if it leans away at the top,tool too high;if it leans away at the bottom, tool too low.I always reccomend learning on an Atlas(if avaliable)because they are simple and easy to make tooling for, also parts are cheap.This doesn't take away from the others(I also have Clausing,South Bend,and Logan).The Atlas book is great as 2-piper said,it includes very helpful charts and tables,as well as instructions.
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Originally Posted By: 2-piper
Atlas made a small bench lathe for many years & it used to be sold by Sears. They also published a very good basic instruction book, probably the equal of the South bend one as I recall. Either the Atlas or the small South Bends are good home lathes, but if any one thinks they are "Fine" they've never run a Monarch or Hardinge etc. I have a South Bend myself at home.


Yes indeed. The Atlas book is more extensive than the SB and has lots of tables and thread info that are not in the SB book.

Ahh...A Hardinge. My are those sweet!

If you mount your lathe on a wooden bench make it as sturdy as possible - it's essential to get the lathe absolutely level with no twist in the bed.

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I have the Atlas book, the one copyrighted in 1937. It's the "Manual of Lathe Operation and Machinist's Tables".

My lathe is similar to this one.
http://www.rolandandcaroline.co.uk/lathe/lathe1.jpg

Last edited by Ken61; 03/28/14 09:24 AM.

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Ken61,
That is an interesting looking antique lathe.I think it would be fun to play with.Do you have an of the "set up" for it, especially "change gears"?The book you have will be very helpful, but I believe your lathe is older.After a second look, this lathe wouldn't take change gears, or chase threads.
Mike

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Neat lathe! It is a nice restoration project. Unfortunately it's not a screw cutting lathe and has no power feed. The knob on the right of the lead screw is used to advance the carriage.

Is there a maker's name on the lathe?

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