577/500 Magnum Alexander Henry

Posted by: AkMike1

577/500 Magnum Alexander Henry - 02/08/13 03:21 PM

This lovely lady celebrates her 134th birthday this year! A best quality 577/500 3 1/8" Magnum. 28" Damascus barrels with very good bores and a 14 3'8" LOP. 9#7oz weight.







Posted by: AkMike1

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/08/13 03:25 PM





Posted by: Mike Harrell

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/08/13 03:28 PM

Like I said, Alex didn't make any bad ones. Aren't those cartridges sexy things? My favorite caliber.
Posted by: AkMike1

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/08/13 03:32 PM

It's wonderful! The packet of BP shells are very old. I got it with the other one.. Yes I have 2 Henrys and T. Turner but alas it's a #2.
I like the 500's!
Posted by: Krakow Kid

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/08/13 04:42 PM

And a sweet-looking lady she is! Looks familiar, but my Henry misses out of the "500 club", she's just a .450.

I NEVER get tired of looking at an Alexander Henry double, whatever the calibre, whatever the age, every one of them is beautiful.

Congratulations!
Posted by: Mike Rowe

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/08/13 06:22 PM

That is quite a rifle, Mike. The Scottish makers certainly had it down to an art from. Some of those fellas in London could have picked up some good tips from them.

So......how many bears have you got with it?
Posted by: AkMike1

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/08/13 06:31 PM

Hello Mike,
I just got this one yesterday. I haven't had a chance to even fit it with your wonderful sling swivels yet! But just as soon as I find a sling worthy of them it WILL happen! If I ever get rich and famous I'm going to need a set of 'proper' loading tools also.

Happen to know where I can find any? smile
Posted by: sharps4590

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/09/13 07:51 AM

Gorgeous, Mike...gorgeous. Thanks for the pictures.
Posted by: Harry Eales

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/10/13 03:19 AM

I wonder how long to took British Double Rifle manufacturers to get around to putting rebounding locks on these rifles? The .577" Double I used to own had the same non-rebounding locks as yours Mike, and over a Century or more, dozens of people must have tried to open the action without first bringing the hammers back to half cock.

If this wasn't done then one of two things happened, one or both of the firing pins got bent or broken, or, the Firing pin tips caught on the extractor, usually in the corner of the groove for the cartridge rim. The are not so easy to repair once the burrs build up and make chambering a round difficult. The drill is easy to remember, Fired or empty, always half cock the locks first, before opening the action.

A very, very, nice rifle Mike, my congratulations.

Harry
Posted by: Humpty Dumpty

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/10/13 03:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Harry Eales
I wonder how long to took British Double Rifle manufacturers to get around to putting rebounding locks on these rifles? T


I've read in some of the period hunting books recommendations to order a double rifle with non-rebounding locks, for the reason that they hit the primer stronger than rebounding locks, and so the rifle is much less likely to dry fire. The price of dry fire in a rifle, especially used on dangerous game, is of course much greater than in a shotgun. Apparently, many clients shared the belief, so the preference of non-rebounding locks might have been due to customer desires, rather than manufacturers'.

The Henry is an absolute beauty anyway.
Posted by: Chasseur d'ours

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/10/13 04:42 AM

Beautiful rifle! As others have said the Scots really knew how to make an express rifle.

Nice case colors left on that one!
Posted by: Rick W

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/10/13 09:34 PM

Always thought the non-rebounding were on early rifles as left over from the percussion era. Rebounding hammer as well as changes in the hammers themselves certainly evolved. Alex was one of the best.
Posted by: AkMike1

Re: 577/500 Magnum - 02/10/13 11:01 PM

I've read that a man named Stanton invented the rebounding hammer locks in 1867-1868. I figure anything with non rebounding hammers is prior to 1870 for a general rule.