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#515582 - 06/09/18 10:31 AM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
KY Jon Offline
Sidelock
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Registered: 03/09/02
Posts: 5733
Loc: Red State
I stocked a .22 Marlin for a friend as a full length Mannlicher stock out of Holly. The Holly had a lot of golden color flakes when the light hit it but from the side it was very white in color. He liked the black and white contrast. That was a very accurate .22 Squirrel killing machine.

I made a stock out of teak for a duck hunter. Very dense wood, oily wood with stringy areas and not fun at all to work with. Dulled tools quickly due to silica in the wood, could cut only in very thin shaving and tools had to be razor sharp to cut it. But the finish surface was almost burnished. Regular polyurethane would not set up at all for a finish. I had to use a two-part polyurethane, the type for marine use, but it lasted for years with no problems. Also water based stains and glues are useless because the woods natural oiliness repels them. Lacquer works well as a finish if you wipe the surface down to remove the surface oils. Since this was going to used in salt marsh I went with the marine poly finish.

As a particle joke I made a 1100 stock for a friend who owned a wood salt treating company, out of some of his salt treated pine. Don't know if it was the short needle or long needle pine variety as they use both. His salt treated wood was for ground contact and could be used in bulk-heading around water. Very dense stuff and a lot of salt chemicals in it. It was a decent cutting wood but nasty stuff to work with. Cover for eyes, skin and breathing had to be worn when working with it. The dust had some nasty chemicals in it. He used it for many years until his death. Never knew where it went after that. The soft green color and the pine grain made it look laminated. A very hard, dense heavy stock when done. Great for those heavy duck loads. Wondered ab out the metal on the 1100 but never pulled it off to check. I did seal all surfaces so it might not been that much of a problem.

Made stocks out of Cocobolo and Zebra Wood. Cocobolo was very dense and heavy, with dust which can be toxic to many. Skin and eye protection was a requirement. The Zebra Wood was very light and easy to work with but had small voids which had to be filled. These were like small empty gum pockets in the wood. The Cocobolo could take extremely fine checkering but you could not go much finer than 16-18 LPI on the Zebra Wood I had.

Also have used Red and White Oak, Hickory, Black Cherry, Screw Bean Mesquite which was a nightmare to use, Butternut, Spruce for pattern stocks and my worst mistake Sweet Gum.

In the wood blank stack I have Madrone burl, Red Elm, Walnuts of most varieties, Maples, both the softer West Coast Maple in burl, curly, fiddle back, shell, crotch and spalted and Northern hard Maple in fiddle and birds eye, Cherry, Sycamore, a True Mahogany, Bocote burl and quarter sawed, Zebra wood both quarter sawed and slab sawed, Plum which I do not think will work well, Apple and Red Wood burl which I am sure will need to be stabilized with some type of acrylic resins under pressure to make it strong and dense enough to use. There might be others I have forgot or just think are worth trying anyways.

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#515588 - 06/09/18 02:26 PM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: KY Jon]
Der Ami Online   content
Sidelock
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Registered: 07/04/12
Posts: 2773
Loc: East Alabama
KY Jon,
We grew up thinking Sweet Gum is worthless, but when Norboard opened an "OSB" plant in the county, they paid as much for it as pine. It has some pretty color, but you can hardly plane it flat, it seems to twist while still in the planer.
Mike

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#515638 - 06/10/18 03:44 PM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
Nick. C Offline
Sidelock
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Registered: 03/30/12
Posts: 574
Loc: North Wales. uk
Hyedua (pronounced shed-ua , I believe) was used by Theoben for their air rifle stocks. It's a beautifully coloured wood . I spoke to the guy who made their stocks as I wanted one making for another gun but they'd stopped using it, he said the dust was extremely irritating and was a carcinogen.
It would probably be ok for a one off made by hand though.


Edited by Nick. C (06/10/18 03:48 PM)
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#515664 - 06/11/18 05:55 AM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
JR1948 Offline
Boxlock

Registered: 06/05/17
Posts: 5
Loc: Harrison, Ark.
I probably couldn't make a stock with modeling clay, but I have made a few knife handles out of sassafras, and always wondered how it would be, as a gun stock. I really love the way it changes colors as the light hits it from different angles.
J.R.

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#515667 - 06/11/18 06:36 AM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
Stan Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/03/02
Posts: 7858
Loc: somwers in Jawja
That's interesting, J.R. Sassafras seems to be fairly hard wood once completely dry. I don't recall having ever seen one around here large enough for a gunstock blank, except for one. It was the world's record sassafras, and lived in a small town near me in the Methodist churchyard. It was cut down years ago due to internal rot.

I've got a sassafras pole that my Grandaddy had for weighing cotton that was hand picked and dumped on big burlap sheets, and tied up at the end of the day. There was a balance beam scale that was tied to the sassafras pole with plowline, and was hooked under the knots in the top of the sheet. Then, two men would lift the sheet of cotton and hold it steady, off the ground, while Grandaddy slid the "pea" along the beam until it balanced. That pole is slick as glass from the thousands of handlings, and hard as a nail.

SRH
_________________________
"Somehow, the sound of a shotgun tends to cheer one up" - Robert Ruark

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#515668 - 06/11/18 06:46 AM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
RARiddell Online   content
Sidelock
**

Registered: 11/03/15
Posts: 281
Any pics of these gun stocks with unique woods?

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#515684 - 06/11/18 02:02 PM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
rocky mtn bill Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 02/06/08
Posts: 860
Loc: MT
KY Jon's mentioning madrone reminded me that I used madone once or twice years ago as material for stock patterns. It carves and rasps very well, but doesn't have much to offer in the way of beauty.
_________________________
Bill Ferguson

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#515693 - 06/11/18 05:09 PM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: RARiddell]
Nick. C Offline
Sidelock
*

Registered: 03/30/12
Posts: 574
Loc: North Wales. uk
_________________________
Rust never sleeps !

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#515980 - 06/16/18 02:34 PM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
Daryl Hallquist Offline
Sidelock
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Registered: 12/31/01
Posts: 5369
Loc: Bozeman, Mt.
Back in the 1960s, a friend who was a very good woodworker used Lacewood for a stock. I think it was called Australian Lacewood. It was light in color and not dense, but made a light weight stock. As I recall, it was harder to fill and finish than most woods.
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#516017 - 06/17/18 06:58 AM Re: Unusual stock woods. [Re: Demonwolf444]
Stan Offline
Sidelock
**

Registered: 01/03/02
Posts: 7858
Loc: somwers in Jawja
While I can, and do, appreciate the workmanship that goes into stocking a gun with an unusual wood, I am too "conservative" to really like any of it. It almost always comes out looking gaudy, or overstated. As much as I like beautiful curly maple, I don't like to see it on anything other than muzzleloaders of the appropriate type. When I see a gun, of any kind, stocked with a wood that wasn't used on them originally, I have to make myself try to like it...............and I usually fail. Maybe if shotgun makers had originally stocked their guns in dogwood, or heart pine, I would see things differently.

JMO, not worth much..............SRH
_________________________
"Somehow, the sound of a shotgun tends to cheer one up" - Robert Ruark

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